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The Eagle's Cry

The Student News Site of Bethpage High School

The Eagle's Cry

The Student News Site of Bethpage High School

The Eagle's Cry

BHS Reviews: The Car

BHS Reviews: The Car

When you hear Arctic Monkeys, you think of Alex Turner. While Turner is an iconic (and very attractive) singer, there’s so much more to one of my favorite bands 🙂

Recently, their new album “The Car” was released. The album has been described as “cinematic” with Turner “assuming the meta-role of an artistically struggling movie director”. Personally, I think “The Car” was a take on a starving musical artist, deprived of passion and left without the ability to romanticize the industry constantly throwing defeat and humility at its successors.

 

The album starts off with a very mellow bang, called “There’d Better Be a Mirrorball” (I saw this song live!!). The song has a unique way of making you feel as if you’ve just entered a bar, and you’re the smooth-talking handsome main character. To me, it sounds like Alex Turner’s sweet talking the mic, which, when is he not. This song details the relationship that Turner finds himself in with a potential love interest, finding himself struggling to navigate the line between common sense and feelings of romantic love that he is trying to stave off.

I relate so. much. to that feeling of desperation knowing that that specific person will likely “walk [him] to the car” but still hoping for one last dance under the figurative “Mirrorball.” Overall, the song by itself could be as high as a 9/10, depending on preference.

 

“I Ain’t Quite Where I Think I Am” is the second song of the album. In my opinion, the song starts off with stable drumming and bass lines, led by a wah-pedal driven riff. The lyrics describe the feeling of not belonging at a social setting/event or in general not fitting in. It’s not a song that stands out to me, but it has a powerful meaning I can deeply relate to. I would rate this song a 7/10 for just the beat and lyrics.

 

Next, we have “Sculptures of Anything Goes”, a song that makes you jump with a hard guitar riff. This song finally lets out Alex Turner’s anger about the fans’ reception of his more recent work. The song “Sculptures of Anything Goes” by Arctic Monkeys is all about the exciting and unpredictable nature of being young. It captures the band’s playful and clever style, especially through the storytelling of lead singer Alex Turner. The lyrics reflect on the wild nightlife of their hometown, Sheffield, England. In terms of how good the song is, that’s really up to personal preference. But many Arctic Monkeys fans absolutely love “Sculptures of Anything Goes” and consider it one of the best tracks from their first album. It’s a perfect example of their energetic music, great songwriting, and unique sound. So, if you like this kind of music, you might give it a high rating of around 8/10 or even higher 🙂

Now for MY FAVORITE.. “Jet Skis on the Moat,” one of the most incomparable, eccentric songs from the album, fully embodying AM’s well-known “garage rock” or “lounge pop”. “Jet Skis on the Moat” is a non-album B-side track released as a part of their EP, The Car. While “The Car” EP was intended to be an unofficial release, it features some of the band’s early recordings and showcases their raw energy and distinct sound. “Jet Skis on the Moat” is an indie rock song by Arctic Monkeys that reminds fans of their earlier music. It starts with a catchy guitar riff and Alex Turner’s vocals are passionate and playful, blending well with the band’s tight playing. The lyrics create a unique image of jet skis on a moat, showcasing Turner’s clever imagination. While not as popular as some of their other songs, it captures their early charm and showcases their talent for catchy melodies and clever lyrics. Fans of their earlier music will enjoy this hidden gem, earning it a solid 7 out of 10 rating.

“Body Paint” is one of Arctic Monkeys’ most iconic and well-known songs. Alex Turner has a particularly paradisical way of implementing his high notes, whispering the words before and after he says the name of the song. The lyrics explore desire, sexuality, and relationship complexities. The lively tempo and catchy chorus make “Body Paint” almost an anthem of the band’s talent for crafting captivating hooks and delivering mesmerizing performances. It is a true masterpiece, and receives a solid 9/10.

“The Car” (i also saw this song live!!) sees the band letting go of the sound of their past in a way that is void of regret and instead driving forward. It’s a very bittersweet and meaningful song, and honestly hits a little too close to home. I think “The Car” should be a good 7/10, mostly because it doesn’t stand out from the rest of the songs in the album.

“Big Ideas” has a slowed-down beat to it as well as well-written lyrics. Alex Turner’s voice takes a different role as a background for the interesting addition of violins in the song. It’s a different approach than the rest of the songs, and for that this song deserves a 8/10.

“Hello You” is this album’s eighth song, and one of this album’s best. “Hello You” also has a very paramore-ey type of rhythm. It’s like listening to Paramore live, not through headphones. Besides the fact that I’ve never been to a Paramore concert, “Hello You” makes it seem like a concert you’ve never been to is being injected right from your ears into your brain. It’s lyrically sharp and aesthetically pleasing to the ears, putting “Hello You” as one of my favorite AM songs. 10/10

Collectively, the songs in this album show that although this is the same Arctic Monkeys, the band has entered a new chapter that we as audiences must respect. Specifically for “Mr Schwartz,” it’s an interesting song about creative self-doubt and disillusionment with the creative process in general, giving this song a 6/10. It doesn’t stand out as much, but the lyrics do.

Perfect Sense is the last song of the album, tying the entire album together with a short, dramatic bow. It’s the shortest track on the album, a glimpse into the lows of the band, and that’s all it is: a glimpse. It ends with no warning, almost alluding towards how some singer’s careers end. 8/10.

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About the Contributor
Lori Novik is currently a junior who loves reading and music at Bethpage High School. They are members of The Eagle’s Cry, the Art Club, Masquerer’s Guild, and Students United. In their free time, they enjoy listening to music and sketching in their notebook. He enjoys endlessly ranting about old movies, pop culture, and books (specifically the ones they constantly read over and over again). They look forward to spending the year writing for The Eagle’s Cry. You´ll find them talking to their lovely friends (who love bullying them), mindlessly scrolling through twitter, and drawing on random sheets of homework.

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